August 10, 2018

Pride, Work and Necessity of Side Projects: UI/UX Designer Shauna Keating Galvanizes the Creative Community of Hudson Valley and Upstate New York



What are you working on—on the side?

I would say that my side project is facilitating the design and tech community in the Hudson Valley and Upstate New York. This takes on a few different forms and takes a little juggling. 

For the last two years, I have been a Co-Organizer of the Hudson Valley Tech Meetup. We are a organization of over 2,500 members that operates out of a meetup.com page. We strive to connect the people in our region doing cool work related to technology. It’s really focused on bringing people together to share the things they are passionate about. Speakers range from students sharing their thesis projects at local colleges, to founders of nationally recognized tech companies sharing what it was like to get to where they are. These gatherings are not just about seeing people talk, though. It’s where the tech community in the Hudson Valley comes together. It’s how a professionals in the area can form a network and see how many people nearby share their interests.





Also in this time, I have helped organize Catskills Conf, which happens in the Hudson Valley every October. This year will be my third time on the organizing team, and the fourth time the conference has run. I attended as a volunteer at the first event as a college student and fell totally in love with it. This is not your average conference. It has the talks about design, development and entrepreneurship that you would expect, but we also have activities like blacksmithing, letterpress and foraging. It’s unique because you get the opportunity to network with great people, but you also get to stay in a cabin with everyone and toast marshmallows around the fire every night. You get the opportunity to get to know people, and skip over the stress that would normally come with attending a conference. The second year, I led the volunteer team and did all the design work for the event. Last year, I tried my hand at emceeing and taking over more responsibility, and am continuing with that this year.

As of a month ago, I am the Co-President of AIGA Upstate New York. AIGA is a national organization with 72+ chapters all over the country. We are the professional association of design, doing work to advance design and designers all over the country. Our chapter focuses on all of New York State that is not New York City or Long Island. I lead a remote team of over 20 people, all of who live in our state. We run events in the Hudson Valley, Capital Region, Ithaca, Syracuse, Binghamton, Rochester, Glens Falls and Buffalo. What drew me to AIGA and why I have stepped up to lead the organization for the next 2 years, is the people in our chapter. Upstate New York has a truly special design community. Through our events and Slack community, we are connecting employers to local talent, helping emerging designers get started, and making it possible for all of us to build a local network we can collaborate with. Through being involved, I have made friends who also work in the design field all over the state that I would have never met otherwise.

Prior to becoming Co-President, I served as Programming Director for a year. This meant I was leading our team of programming coordinators—the people on the ground in all the locations listed above—and helping them run design-focused events. These include our monthly coffee and cocktails meetups, our annual Design Crawl (think bar crawl, but design talks and studio visits mixed in!), and our emerging designers’ portfolio reviews. Since I am in the Hudson Valley myself, I also help run our local events, and go to them.



I also periodically speak at conferences, mostly on the topic of inclusive design. Most recently, I traveled to Charlottesville, Virginia, to participate in a panel about the topic, as well as to be a keynote speaker at a diversity-focused hackathon, hacking.digital. I think it is important to share my research and hear other people’s perspectives on this topic.



This is the part where the person I am talking to says, “Wow! You’re really busy!”

How do you manage to work
on your side project(s)?

I would not be able to do any of this without the complete support of my partner, my friends and co-workers. Many people try really hard to keep their career and their personal life completely separate, and while there definitely isn’t anything wrong with that, (everyone has a right to lead their life in the way they want!) that approach just isn’t how my life has gone. The people I spend my free time with are also the people I get to work alongside, which can be a really special thing. Knowing the people you work with can result in much more meaningful work, and better understanding of one another overall.

A lot of the time, I will stay at my desk for an extra hour or two after my work day is complete, sending emails to speakers for the Catskills Conf or chatting with our board members for AIGA, making sure they have the resources they need to be successful. Occasionally, a weekend will get sacrificed here or there. It’s not the easiest thing, but my take on it is if you want something to exist, you can’t wait around for it to happen. I care a lot about the place where I live—and I want it to be somewhere that people can feel like they can be successful in their careers. I really believe I live in one of the most beautiful and kind places in the world, and I want more people to have the opportunity to do meaningful work here.

 I’ll also say, none of this would be possible if I were trying to do it alone. All three of these organizations that have members, sponsors and organizing teams that make it all happen!

Why have a side project?

Working on something you are passionate about and getting a lot of creative freedom with can make such a big difference. It is a great opportunity for personal growth. I learn new things all the time that I would never learn at work that are really beneficial to me in the long run. I am developing the leadership skills I’ll need someday when I’m a Creative Director, as well as just learning the ins and outs of how organizations really work.

 A side project can be such a great opportunity to find your people. This is especially true to folks who might not be at their dream job, or who just aren’t finding their day-to-day very fulfilling. This is how you can get to do exactly what you want, and even open up important doors for yourself later by building the right network.

 Also, it’s just really great to do what you want! A lot of what I do is collaborative and team-based, but lots of people do their side project on their own or in a smaller group. While critique and constructive criticism are crucial to our design processes, it can be really empowering to just make something because you want to and don’t have to go back and change it for someone else.

• • •

Diptych and photo of the Catskills Conf courtesy of Shauna Keating—portrait by Jen Thomas.


This series, devoted to side projects, is delivered in association with Chicago creative agency 50,000feet—dedicated to helping brands and businesses soar.


Donating = Appreciating: Design Feast is now on Patreon!
Lots of hours are put into making Design Feast—because it’s a labor of love to provide creative culture to everyone. If you find delight and motivation from the hundreds of interviews, including event write-ups, at Design Feast, please consider becoming a supporting Patron with a recurring monthly donation.

Please help keep Design Feast going and growing by visiting my Patreon page where you can watch a short intro video plus view my goals and reward tiers, from $1 to $12—between a souvenir and a satisfying brunch.

August 8, 2018

Pride, Work and Necessity of Side Projects: Woodworker Katie Thompson Highlights and Advocates the International Community of Woodworking Women



What are you working on—on the side?

Women of Woodworking is a multimedia project focused on sharing the stories of women in the woodworking craft. I write essays, take photographs and engage the community on social media, mainly Instagram. I plan to expand towards videos and other opportunities to grow this project.

How do you manage to work
on your side project(s)?

This project fits in nicely with a lot of things that I love to do and am fortunate enough to do for a living. I love taking photographs, mainly portraits, but I’m rather new at that. I have always loved writing, meeting new people and telling their stories. I also design and make products for a living, so it’s relatively easy to talk about my colleagues who are doing fantastic work.

Why have a side project?

My short answer is that I’m a workaholic with a lot of interests and I’m obsessed with creating things myself. I also think it’s good to have passion projects, because even if you love your work, it can still be “work.” Some people just need more than one creative outlet to explore their curiosities.

When I started Women of Woodworking years ago, it was because I felt there wasn’t a thriving space on the Web quite yet for women in the craft—but we were out there, making our own space. I took a sabbatical from the project for a few years but it would never stop completely, because people from around the world would reach out trying to find a woodworker for a job, share a story or a photo, or simply to chat. I observed that this online community, appreciative of woodworking, had grown and was thriving, and it made me realize that the seeds a lot of us had planted a few years back, especially the woodworking women who came before us, were now flourishing. When I say we’re making our own space, we’re literally taking buildings and opening their doors to give women and minorities access to the craft of woodworking like never before, through schools, symposiums, studios, co-ops and retail spaces. I wanted to document this evolving moment for us, and saw that there was still a need to help continue the woodworking community’s passion and conversation.

• • •

Diptych courtesy of Katie Thompson.

• • •

Katie Thompson, with her woodworker-husband Joseph, also shares her thoughts on launching a handmade product-based business as part of my interviews—101 so far—with independent Makers. Furthermore, they give their point of view on design and designing in my series Designer’s Quest(ionnaire). And read more about the joy of side projects.


This series, devoted to side projects, is delivered in association with Chicago creative agency 50,000feet—dedicated to helping brands and businesses soar.


Donating = Appreciating: Design Feast is now on Patreon!
Lots of hours are put into making Design Feast—because it’s a labor of love to provide creative culture to everyone. If you find delight and motivation from the hundreds of interviews, including event write-ups, at Design Feast, please consider becoming a supporting Patron with a recurring monthly donation.

Please help keep Design Feast going and growing by visiting my Patreon page where you can watch a short intro video plus view my goals and reward tiers, from $1 to $12—between a souvenir and a satisfying brunch.

July 1, 2018

Pride, Work and Necessity of Side Projects: Graphic Designer Belinda Kou Cultivates Her Hand-Lettering Craft



What are you working on—on the side?

For the past year and a half, I have been challenging myself to hand-letter on a regular basis. It began as random doodles that I would draw here and there, in the margins of the day, until I decided to really focus and commit to a 100-Day Project of daily lettering. It challenged me to practice consistently and embrace progress over perfection, which was my biggest hurdle at the time to create anything outside of work. I ended up creating an Instagram account to house all of my drawings as a form of accountability, and it has since grown into a lab space where I can experiment with different styles, refine existing ones and connect with the greater lettering community out there. It has also sparked several ideas for new lettering series, so stay tuned for future project launches!

How do you manage to work
on your side project(s)?

I fill up my time outside of working hours with lettering, mostly in the evenings and on the weekends. The kind of lettering I do is very different from the work I do during the day, so I find the creative challenge fun and motivating enough to commit to those extra hours outside of work. Completing the 100-Day Project has opened my eyes to how much more time I actually have, if I just committed to it, and even a few minutes a day can be so rewarding in the long-run.

Why have a side project?

My side projects are driven by personal passion and provide a creative outlet to what I do at work. I’ve found that combining side projects with challenging work projects has been a sweet spot for hitting that creative high, where you not only feel a sense of accomplishment in the contributions you make but also experience a ton of growth in skills. Taking the time to refine my hand-lettering craft also helps me to approach my creative strategy at my day job with a different eye, and I am able to hone a keener eye to grid layouts in typography and quick concept sketches. Essentially, side projects help me to build up skills outside of work and add fuel to my creative fire. I would recommend anyone who is feeling burned out or stagnant in their career path to pursue a side project to reignite their creative spark.

• • •

Diptych courtesy of Belinda Kou.


This series, devoted to side projects, is delivered in association with Chicago creative agency 50,000feet—dedicated to helping brands and businesses soar.


Donating = Appreciating: Design Feast is now on Patreon!
Lots of hours are put into making Design Feast—because it’s a labor of love to provide creative culture to everyone. If you find delight and motivation from the hundreds of interviews, including event write-ups, at Design Feast, please consider becoming a supporting Patron with a recurring monthly donation.

Please help keep Design Feast going and growing by visiting my Patreon page where you can watch a short intro video plus view my goals and reward tiers, from $1 to $12—between a souvenir and a satisfying brunch.

June 15, 2018

Pride, Work and Necessity of Side Projects: Product Designer and Business Founder Maria Boustead’s Quest for Sustainability



What are you working on—on the side?

The “Quest for Sustainability” is my side project, a video series that documents my journey in creating a more sustainable line of bike bags.

Po Campo makes bags that make it easier to carry what you need on and off your bike with style and ease. We know that one of the main reasons our customers opt to bike for transportation is because it is good for the environment, so should the products they’re using also be as good as possible for the environment? To that end, I started working on a line of eco-friendly bags and quickly had lots of questions. One of the realities of sustainable design is that there is no singular path to sustainability; in other words, there are many roads that you can take, where improving in one area can mean worsening in another. As I was navigating these trade-offs, I was reaching out to other people to help gain some perspective. I found the journey to be really interesting and, wanting to invite our community along on it, started a video series called the “Quest for Sustainability.” Each week, I post a video of me tackling one aspect of the process, and I’m looking for people to comment about what they’re interested in and what means the most to them.

How do you manage to work
on your side project(s)?

I know video projects can be time-intensive, so I hired a video-editing intern to help me with the project. I try not to get too obsessed with the production value on the videos, instead opting for a rawer, more intimate look that I can produce more easily. But, between lining up the interviews, reviewing footage and promoting each episode, it has certainly spilled into the evenings and weekends.

Why have a side project?

I think it’s the creative person in me that always wants to make something new, discover something new. Even though Po Campo adds new products all the time, I was yearning to branch out a little and challenge myself.

• • •

Diptych courtesy of Maria Boustead, photographed
by Shelly Waldman.

• • •

Maria Boustead also shares her thoughts on launching a product-based business as part of my interviews—101 so far—with independent Makers. And read more about the joy of side projects.


This series, devoted to side projects, is delivered in association with Chicago creative agency 50,000feet—dedicated to helping brands and businesses soar.


Donating = Appreciating: Design Feast is now on Patreon!
Lots of hours are put into making Design Feast—because it’s a labor of love to provide creative culture to everyone. If you find delight and motivation from the hundreds of interviews, including event write-ups, at Design Feast, please consider becoming a supporting Patron with a recurring monthly donation.

Please help keep Design Feast going and growing by visiting my Patreon page where you can watch a short intro video plus view my goals and reward tiers, from $1 to $12—between a souvenir and a satisfying brunch.

June 2, 2018

Pride, Work and Necessity of Side Projects: Illustrator Rukmini Poddar Draws from a Monumental Range of Emotions



What are you working on—on the side?

In 2016, I started a series called “100 Obscure Emotions.” I never intended on it becoming a book. I didn’t even believe I could complete the challenge of drawing for 100 days straight. But the magic of this experience was that I learnt to simply trust the process. So without any prior experience in illustration, I learnt to discipline myself to pick up my pen and just draw each day. As the project continued, I felt more confident in myself and I felt encouraged by how people were resonating with my images online. More than a challenge in drawing—it was a challenge in being vulnerable. I soon learnt that what is most personal is most universal. I also saw how honesty is always attractive. So the more honest I was in my drawings, the more inspired other people would be. I found that art could hold space for healing, and it could even translate the most obscure and intangible of emotions. After 100 days, I published my series of works into a book. This single side project changed a lot for me.

My second side project was an off-shoot of this idea, however, now I draw other people’s emotions. It’s called “Dear Ruksi” and it’s similar to an advice column, except I don’t offer advice. I simply lend a listening ear, an empathetic heart and a drawing hand. In the last year, I’ve drawn over 70 illustrations based off of anonymous submissions of people who have anonymously shared their heart with me. It’s opened such a healing and empathetic space and I find it to be a unique combination of therapy and illustration.



My third side project is what I’m currently working on and what I’m most excited about. I’m dedicating 100 days to exploring the Enneagram and translating it into a visual guide. The Enneagram is a complex but incredibly nuanced and thorough system of understanding the human phyche. It’s an immensely powerful tool for understanding ourselves better. It’s become my personal goal to translate this system of knowledge into easily understandable and quickly drawn illustrations.

How do you manage to work
on your side project(s)?

I started doing my side projects almost accidentally. In 2015, I discovered something called “The 100 Day Project” and I decided to participate for the sake of “getting away from my computer.” Little did I know what a journey I would be on. I feel like I’ve re-discovered my passion for creativity through doing “The 100 Day Project” each year. This year will be my fourth time doing so!

So yes, since 2015, I keep aside 100 days to do a marathon of a creative project. But the wonderful thing is that its sustainable because I do a little each day. One sketch a day and before I know—I have enough for a book. And there’s really nothing more satisfying than steady progress over time.

Why have a side project?

For me, side projects have helped me to carve out and develop my identity as an artist. We all have a unique story to tell, but we won’t ever know what that is until we take time to simply create for the joy of creating. This can so easily be lost when we are always busy working for others. But the life-breath of an artist is to find their own voice and share it with others.

• • •

Diptych courtesy of Rukmini Poddar.

• • •

Read more about the joy of side projects.


This series, devoted to side projects, is delivered in association with Chicago creative agency 50,000feet—dedicated to helping brands and businesses soar.


Donating = Appreciating: Design Feast is now on Patreon!
Lots of hours are put into making Design Feast—because it’s a labor of love to provide creative culture to everyone. If you find delight and motivation from the hundreds of interviews, including event write-ups, at Design Feast, please consider becoming a supporting Patron with a recurring monthly donation.

Please help keep Design Feast going and growing by visiting my Patreon page where you can watch a short intro video plus view my goals and reward tiers, from $1 to $12—between a souvenir and a satisfying brunch.

May 13, 2018

When It Comes to Creativity, Stephanie Andujar, from Acting and Singing to Fashion Design and Modeling, is a One Woman Show


It was while binge-watching the first three seasons of the Netflix TV series “Orange Is the New Black” (2013–Present) that I discovered Stephanie Andujar, who gave an unforgettable performance as Young Rosa. Here, she elaborates on proactively driving her creative pursuits.

Firstly, do you have Family and Friends in Puerto Rico? How are they doing? Hope they are doing well! Thinking about the people of Puerto Rico. Thank you for your efforts in giving relief and development.

Thank you for asking me that! I have some family out there and know that they are OK—however, the situation regarding Puerto Rico is not, you know. We have been put through so much for so long. At this point, we’re warriors and will continue to stand for what is ours. To just be treated as human beings. Mi gente Boricua sigue palente!

Been appreciating your championing the involvement by your Mom and Siblings in your creative pursuits. How does Family play a role in your creativity and work?

Yes! My family means everything to me because they’re my support system and help produce my “StephA: One Woman Show” along with everything else in my life with Andujar Productions! I also champion them because they’re artists as well: My mother is a chef/interior designer; My sister, Melanie, is a graphic designer and My lil’ brother is an artist! We’re the Super Creative Andujar Fam! LOL.



In your online bio, there’s something about “the school program that would change the course of her life.” What was this school program and how did it influence/inspire you? So cool that your Parents encouraged such a program for you to participate in. How are your Parents engaged/connected with creativity/the arts?

In 1997/1998, my mom put me into a Beacon After School Program and that’s where I found what I was good at and what I loved! Acting, singing and dancing! A talent manager scouted me out from the play I was in, “The Wiz”—I was the scarecrow (below), and from there, I knew I wanted to try for drama school and keep performing. Found my calling you could say! My mom grew up watching “I Love Lucy” and my father loved films. Mix both those up and there you have me—a lil’ comedy and drama.



How did you get to play the young Miss Rosa character an effing magnetic performance—in Season 2 of Netflix’s “Orange is the New Black”?

Thank you! I auditioned for the role of Young Rosa. I had actually auditioned for other roles on “Orange Is the New Black”—the casting director brought me in for this role and it just happened to fit! It was so fun getting to play this tough, cool, sexy character because it’s exciting, and who doesn’t wanna feel sexy and tough, right?!



Among your acting gigs, you also write and portray a cast of characters in “StephA: One Woman Show” → Write, sing and record your own songs → Design and sew your own clothes in “StephAsCollection” → Choreograph and dance → In addition to other projects I’m probably missing to highlight here. With all that you’re making, how do you manage your time to be productive as possible with your creative ambitions?

Crazy, right?! LOL. I love to create and being that I…we…have the opportunity to make what we want right now, it’s a great time to do just that. My one woman show came about too because my sister knew I could handle comedy and suggested I showcase my upbringing, and that’s where all these characters started coming to life. After that, I figured…why not keep going—start singing, dancing and sewing (below)! Do what you love while you’re here!



With all that goes on in realizing your adventures in acting, singing, dancing, more, how do you deal with stress? What ways of taking care yourself have proved helpful consistently?

I love to exercise, dance, ride, bike. These are ways to deal with all the other things that can weigh you down, but since I love a lot of what I do, I remind myself…yes, working out right now sounds like blah…but the results are so worth it. LOL. Also taking a walk with my Chihuahua Teeka (below) by the piers…she helps bring me peace. LOL.



What software/Web-based tools do you use and recommend highly to work on ideas and make them grow, to collaborate and get things done?

I work with Final Cut Pro a lot. YouTube, where you can see my “StephA: One Woman Show,” also has great tutorial videos on a lot of software programs that I think are great to learn from! Everything else is by trial and error, giving it a try and taking it from there.

How would you describe success?

I think that’s up to the individual because everyone might have a different definition for them. But I think it’s doing what you love and accomplishing goals that are meaningful to you. If you feel good, then that’s all that matters.

What artistic performances from film/TV/music/theater have stuck with you, that you keep going back to?

I actually love Al Pacino’s performances, especially from “Scarface” (1983). He was my inspiration for Young Rosa. Also for my recent character on “Blue Bloods,” I channeled a bit of Al Pacino and Heath Ledger as the Joker…Iconic actors and performances. I also read Lucille Ball’s memories in her autobiography “Love, Lucy” (1996) and always go back to reread advice she gives to actors!


Quad Cinema, New York City: Q&A for premiere screening of “Marjorie Prime” (2017), written and directed by Michael Almereyda (second from left), starring Lois Smith (third from left), Stephanie Andujar and Jon Hamm.


Quad Cinema, New York City: In a self-made dress at the premiere screening of the independent film “Marjorie Prime” (2017).

Are there actors/screenwriters/directors 
you want to work with?

There are so many who are great and talented…An opportunity with the best in the business is all I could ever dream of!

What are you must-experience movies/TV shows at this time?

Of course, check out “Blue Bloods” and “StephA: One Woman Show.” Actually, I did see “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” with my sister and I thought that was a great movie with great performances—a must-see.

In these charged times, what can individuals in the entertainment world do to contribute immediately to a better community/society moving forward?

I would hope for people to keep creating for the proper growth of our time here, to love each other as best we can. It’s easier said then done, but it can be done. Let free expression be for all and not just for some, you know. Let’s create for the next generation, so they know we took care of them and they can do the same for the next.

When/if you are approached by someone who expressed, “I want to become an actor,” what’s your response?

Have perseverance and a thick skin! LOL. It’s a climb, you know, in anything you want to pursue. But if this is what you want, then go for it! Do know that there will be obstacles ahead. You have to be brave and stick to the plan!

How does the city of New York contribute to your work? What makes it special for startups/business/creativity-at-large?

As a born-bred New Yorker, I can say it’s a Love-Hate relationship. LOL. NYC knows the deal! It truly is one of the best cities in the world. I use a lot of the city as backdrops and different locales around town to put New York front and center. Growing up here since I was born has been amazing, and I’ve seen the evolution of it. Getting to film it and play in the city makes it that much more special.

In the comic-book sense, what super power 
would you possess and why?

Hmmm, let’s see, I really love Batman, the Tim Burton version. I would then choose Cat Woman from the second Tim Burton “Batman” installment. Having nine lives and cat reflexes would be dope! My mom actually dressed me like her too when I was like 5 or 6. LOL. So yea, again, sexy, tough, the role for me!

• • •

All images courtesy of Carmen Andujar.

• • •

Read more from Design Feast Series of 101 (so far) Interviews
with people who love making things.


Donating = Appreciating: Design Feast is now on Patreon!
Lots of hours are put into making Design Feast—because it’s a labor of love to provide creative culture to everyone. If you find delight and motivation from the hundreds of interviews, including event write-ups, at Design Feast, please consider becoming a supporting Patron with a recurring monthly donation.

Please help keep Design Feast going and growing by visiting my Patreon page where you can watch a short intro video plus view my goals and reward tiers, from $1 to $12—between a souvenir and a satisfying brunch.

May 2, 2018

Pride, Work and Necessity of Side Projects: Type Designer Dyana Weissman Craves and Explores The Great Outdoors



What are you working on—on the side?

I co-lead hikes in a nearby state park, The Middlesex Fells Reservation. Every week, we guide new parents who carry their babies on a different trail. This gives them an opportunity to meet others going through the same experience, get some exercise, avoid isolation, and enjoy the benefits of being immersed in nature. In the summers, we also do short treks for young children, making a scavenger hunt out of learning about wildlife. The hikes are all free and open to the public. I take pictures, too, so families can stay in the moment, and still have those memories captured.

I am also on staff at the Independent Film Festival of Boston. I help manage volunteers for a couple shifts during the main festival, and usher at other events during the year. It’s nice having connections in all sorts of communities.

How do you manage to work
on your side project(s)?

I’m fortunate that my bosses are very supportive of having balance in life. I make my own hours, so I schedule projects around the hikes, as if they were meetings. Which they are, in a way. During the week of the film festival, I take a vacation.

Why have a side project?

I need to do something that has a deeper meaning to me. I care intensely about the environment and climate change. Getting people into parks is a great way to get them to care, too. It’s the same with the film festival—it helps people get out, share an experience, and learn about the world.

And it’s not just about others, I'm doing something for myself, too. It’s so nice to be out in the fresh air and sunshine, not hunched over a computer. I feel less stressed and more in shape. There’s a feeling of accomplishment after a good hike, and a sense of honor in helping people out.

Walking in the woods also helps me to be a better designer. I avoid burnout, as I always feel refreshed after a hike. Being away from distractions helps me to problem-solve and come up with new ideas. I usually take my camera, so I get to flex different creative muscles, too. The world is so fascinating; there is so much to experience. It’s important to stay curious and to always be learning.

• • •

Diptych courtesy of Dyana Weissman.

• • •

Read more about the joy of side projects.


This series, devoted to side projects, is delivered in association with Chicago creative agency 50,000feet—dedicated to helping brands and businesses soar.


Donating = Appreciating: Design Feast is now on Patreon!
Lots of hours are put into making Design Feast—because it’s a labor of love to provide creative culture to everyone. If you find delight and motivation from the hundreds of interviews, including event write-ups, at Design Feast, please consider becoming a supporting Patron with a recurring monthly donation.

Please help keep Design Feast going and growing by visiting my Patreon page where you can watch a short intro video plus view my goals and reward tiers, from $1 to $12—between a souvenir and a satisfying brunch.